Tag Archives: world

Is James From ‘The End Of The F***ing World’ Based On A Real Person? The Character Comes From A Comic

The protagonist of the new Netflix series The End of the F***ing World might seem familiar to anyone who has enjoyed a series with an unsympathetic main character. James is a self-proclaimed psychopath who has lived a numb life until classmate Alyssa comes into it. Still, he decides to kill her just to test how deep his lack of feeling goes. In a world of Walter Whites and Dexter Morgans, James could fit right in. But is he one of a type or is James from The End of the F***ing World based on a real person?

It doesn’t seem like anyone real inspired James, though there were a few different sources of inspiration for Charles Forsman, the author and artist of the graphic novel on which the show is based. After finishing a visually complex comic called Celebrated Summer, Read more at: https://www.romper.com/p/is-james-from-the-end-of-the-fing-world-based-on-a-real-person-the-character-comes-from-a-comic-7774418

Is James From ‘The End Of The F***ing World’ Based On A Real …

The protagonist of the new Netflix series The End of the F***ing World might seem familiar to anyone who has enjoyed a series with an unsympathetic main character. James is a self-proclaimed psychopath who has lived a numb life until classmate Alyssa comes into it. Still, he decides to kill her just to test how deep his lack of feeling goes. In a world of Walter Whites and Dexter Morgans, James could fit right in. But is he one of a type or is James from The End of the F***ing World based on a real person?

It doesn’t seem like anyone real inspired James, though there were a few different sources of inspiration for Charles Forsman, the author and artist of the graphic novel on which the show is based. After finishing a visually complex comic called Celebrated Summer, Read more at: https://www.romper.com/p/is-james-from-the-end-of-the-fing-world-based-on-a-real-person-the-character-comes-from-a-comic-7774418

Death Becomes Her: Inside the Nutshell World of Frances Glessner Lee

If you’re around Washington D.C. this winter, you might want to consider swinging through the Renwick Gallery, located just a stone’s throw from the White House. A new display there, called “Murder Is Her Hobby,” features the work of Frances Glessner Lee, who used dollhouses to recreate real-life crime scenes and then used them to train homicide detectives. Each scene is exquisitely detailed, complete with tiny cups and saucers, charming wallpaper, and—always—a dead body, sometimes swinging from a rope or riddled with bullet holes. A flashlight and a crime report, written by Lee, accompany each of the 19 scenes.

Lee was friends with the kind of hard-nosed, fast talking detectives we romanticize in fiction today, and each story reads like something from the golden age of film noir. To wit:

“Dark Bathroom (ca. 1944-48)

Reported by Desk Sergeant Moriarty of the Central City Police as he recalled it.

Maggie Wilson found dead by

Read more at: http://www.weeklystandard.com/death-becomes-her-inside-the-nutshell-world-of-frances-glessner-lee/article/2010992

Tour PwC Canada’s Digital Experience Centre | IT World Canada …

PwC Canada’s new Digital Experience Centre is part crime scene investigation training, part virtual reality arcade, and part playground.

It seems like every office is experimenting with some sort of Labs space these days. But at PwC, the consulting agency is building on its global experience. There are a network of 35 similar spaces around the world, including in Tokyo, New York, and London.

This 8,000 square-foot space will see PwC work alongside its clients, using outside-the-box thinking to solve business problems. In the virtual reality room, journalists are demoing immersive experiences created for public sector clients. That includes applications in health, military, and social justice areas.

In the IoT space, this demo is set up to show how a radio link can help monitor autonomous cars navigating a busy highway. When this system detects problems with any one car, that feedback is sent to all cars to help them adapt.

Another room is showcasing how augmented reality can

Read more at: https://www.itworldcanada.com/video/tour-pwc-canadas-digital-experience-centre

In Chester County, residents see the world through a cop’s eyes

Police Officer Steve Dintino, 61, handed a Glock .40-caliber pistol, modified for training in a virtual simulator, to first-time shooter Nancy Griffith and told her that slow, steady pressure on the trigger was the key.

Dintino said to remember that when the virtual bad guy jumped up firing at her from a row of seats in a movie theater he was terrorizing, “Your most important shot is your first one because it might be the only one you get.”

Griffith is one of nine people in the first-ever Citizens’ Police Academy presented by the East Pikeland Township, West Vincent Township, and Spring City Borough police departments to help residents view police work through a cop’s eyes.

Meeting from 6 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday nights through Jan. 17 at the Chester County Technical College High School

Read more at: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/pennsylvania/in-chester-county-residents-see-split-second-shootdont-shoot-virtual-scenes-through-a-cops-eyes-20171204.html

The Tiny, Murderous World Of Frances Glessner Lee

How do you learn to solve a crime? Police detectives spend years learning on the job, sifting through evidence in real world crime scenes. But a new show at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington D.C. explores another approach — it’s called Murder Is Her Hobby, and it showcases the work of one woman who was both a master craftswoman, and a pioneer in the field of forensic crime scene investigation. Her teaching tool? Tiny replica crime scenes.

And at first glance, there’s something undeniably charming about the 19 dioramas on display. That is, of course, until you start to notice the macabre little details: an overturned chair, or a blood spattered comforter. And there’s always a body — stabbed, drowned, shot — or something more mysterious.

The tiny cans of food in these model rooms, the newspapers printed with barely legible newsprint, the ashtrays

Read more at: http://wwno.org/post/tiny-murderous-world-frances-glessner-lee

The Tiny, Murderous World Of Frances Glessner Lee

How do you learn to solve a crime? Police detectives spend years learning on the job, sifting through evidence in real world crime scenes. But a new show at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington D.C. explores another approach — it’s called Murder Is Her Hobby, and it showcases the work of one woman who was both a master craftswoman, and a pioneer in the field of forensic crime scene investigation. Her teaching tool? Tiny replica crime scenes.

And at first glance, there’s something undeniably charming about the 19 dioramas on display. That is, of course, until you start to notice the macabre little details: an overturned chair, or a blood spattered comforter. And there’s always a body — stabbed, drowned, shot — or something more mysterious.

The tiny cans of food in these model rooms, the newspapers printed with barely legible newsprint, the ashtrays

Read more at: http://apr.org/post/tiny-murderous-world-frances-glessner-lee

The Tiny, Murderous World Of Frances Glessner Lee

How do you learn to solve a crime? Police detectives spend years learning on the job, sifting through evidence in real world crime scenes. But a new show at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington D.C. explores another approach — it’s called Murder Is Her Hobby, and it showcases the work of one woman who was both a master craftswoman, and a pioneer in the field of forensic crime scene investigation. Her teaching tool? Tiny replica crime scenes.

And at first glance, there’s something undeniably charming about the 19 dioramas on display. That is, of course, until you start to notice the macabre little details: an overturned chair, or a blood spattered comforter. And there’s always a body — stabbed, drowned, shot — or something more mysterious.

The tiny cans of food in these model rooms, the newspapers printed with barely legible newsprint, the ashtrays

Read more at: http://nprillinois.org/post/tiny-murderous-world-frances-glessner-lee

Forensics society learns real-world CSI skills from former Texas Ranger

Conifer Colorado Junior Austin Johnson holds up a freshly taken fingerprint.

By Magdalayna Drivas | Reporter

If you’ve ever wanted to collect fingerprints, analyze bloodstain patterns and solve murder mysteries alongside a former Texas Ranger, Baylor has a club for you.

The Baylor forensic society provides students education, training and hands-on experience with different scientific techniques used in forensic investigations, as well as fellowship and networking with others interested in the field.

“We have biweekly meetings and events at each meeting where we go into a certain subject within forensic science,” Austin junior and forensic society vice president Janie Contreras said. “At this week’s meeting we’ll be fingerprinting. We learn different skills related to forensic science, but we also get to do things like pre-screen a new CBS show about forensic science.”

Members of the society have the privilege of working with former Texas

Read more at: http://baylorlariat.com/2017/09/07/forensics-society-learns-real-world-csi-skills-from-former-texas-ranger/