Tag Archives: students

Sorority reaches out to children; gift bags given to Project Life, other students

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Read more at: http://thetandd.com/news/local/sorority-reaches-out-to-children-gift-bags-given-to-project/article_8058f65f-a6f4-5737-820a-885f089e4aa9.html

Radford University students train on crime scene investigations

RADFORD, Va. (WDBJ7) At Radford University, the same practices used to analyze the crime scene in New York terrorist attack were being done by students training for a similar situation.

Criminal Justice Professor and former police officer Tod Burke set up a scene with a victim and clues all around a classroom. And while the destruction wasn’t anywhere near what happened in New York, Burke said, in execution, the investigation is the same.

“If you look at what’s going on in New York right now, you have a crime scene, our students here have a crime scene,” Burke said. “The difference might be the location but everything else, they still have to follow procedures. It’s not always easy, especially if a crime scene has been compromised.”

In New York, it was the public on the scene risking compromising the investigation. In Radford, it was first arriving police and the media, which were

Read more at: http://www.wdbj7.com/content/news/Radford-University-students-train-on-crime-scene-investigations-454607523.html

John Jay students dig up the dead in mock crime scene at Central Park

Twice a year, Angelique Corthals digs a shallow grave in Central Park – and buries a skeleton with a skull that took a bad blow to the head.

The macabre spectacle unfolds at a composting site along a stretch of the park’s East Drive. It’s a popular spot for runners, bicyclists and dog walkers – but no one bats an eye as Corthals shovels dirt onto the body.

“The only people who seem to care are the tourists,” said Corthals, a Belgian-born forensic anthropologist who teaches at John Jay College.

“New Yorkers who live here say, ‘You know what? I’d rather not look into that. I’ll read what happened in the newspapers.”

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Dr. Angelique Corthals (left), an assistant professor in Forensic and Biomedical

Read more at: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/manhattan/john-jay-students-dig-dead-mock-central-park-crime-scene-article-1.3581852

A game of clue: Police Academy students study crime scenes

Investigators stared at a “body” lying face first on the floor. Three bullet casings scattered across the room and a syringe lying on a nearby nightstand. Eyes peeled, those in the room swiftly jotted down items considered potential evidence of what foul play had occurred before they arrived.

And while the scene might have looked and felt like one from the longstanding CBS drama “CSI,” the players were not seasoned detectives, but students in the Madison County Citizens’ Police Academy.

The mock crime scene set up Monday night at the Department of Criminal Justice Training campus allowed students to put into practice the principles of crime scene investigation in rooms set up like a mock apartment building.

Principles of crime scene investigation begin at one idea: the theory of transfer. According to this theory, any time two objects or things come into contact with each other, there is an exchange of material between

Read more at: http://www.richmondregister.com/news/a-game-of-clue-police-academy-students-study-crime-scenes/article_9a9bf7be-b399-11e7-9694-63cd201a933c.html

CMU students have hands-on investigations in mock crime scene



Imagine if Stephen King knew nothing about crime scene investigations.

Budding writer Delany Lemke is making sure that won’t happen to her.

The senior English major was totally in her element when the area south of Anspach Hall became an active crime scene of sorts at Central Michigan University.

Lemke, from Marysville, and her “Principles of forensic anthropology” classmates suited up in full crime scene investigation gear — vests, gloves, foot protectors and face masks — for hands-on preparation to handle real-life investigations.

Students learn crime scene investigation at SOSS

Southern Okanagan Secondary School has introduced a new course that has students use forensics to investigate crime scenes.

By Marlysse Trampf

Southern Okanagan Secondary School (SOSS) is turning into a crime scene with an exciting new class.

In recent years there have been some interesting new courses introduced to SOSS’s curriculum that are really piquing students’ interest. Perhaps the most popular is Gordon Wurflinger’s Forensics 11 class.
“The class looks at the science of forensics, to see what forensic scientists look at when dealing with different types of evidence,” he said.

The class begins by building on the students’ science skills, and there’s a bit of physics, chemistry, biology (for entomology) as well as using microscopes.

Once the students have a base knowledge of basic crime scene investigation, they will start simulating crime scenes for each other to analyze. Case studies are another

Read more at: http://www.oliverchronicle.com/students-learn-crime-scene-investigation-at-soss/

GNTC offering drone classes for law enforcement students

From tracking weather to handling traffic situations, drones are allowing authorities to have eyes on areas they would not usually be able to access easily.

Because of this Georgia Northwestern Technical College has purchased two new DJI-series Phantom drones and is training law enforcement students to use them in the field.

GNTC Criminal Justice Technology Director Tony Adams, who has over 13 years field experience with Georgia’s State Board of Pardons and Paroles, said these unmanned and compact remote-controlled vehicles are helping change the way many departments are getting their jobs done.

“As more and more departments deploy drones they continue to prove their value,” added Adams. “They provide incredible situational awareness to emergency services teams. Police officers, fire fighters, and SWAT teams across the country use drones for search and rescue, crime scene investigation, accident investigation, criminal pursuit, forest fire tracking, and damage assessment. Drones are not just toys or flying cameras.”

Students

Read more at: http://www.northwestgeorgianews.com/region/gntc-offering-drone-classes-for-law-enforcement-students/article_3081ecf2-a238-11e7-af2f-a38760b8e0a1.html

GNTC offering drone classes for law enforcement students

From tracking weather to handling traffic situations, drones are allowing authorities to have eyes on areas they would not usually be able to access easily.

Because of this Georgia Northwestern Technical College has purchased two new DJI-series Phantom drones and is training law enforcement students to use them in the field.

GNTC Criminal Justice Technology Director Tony Adams, who has over 13 years field experience with Georgia’s State Board of Pardons and Paroles, said these unmanned and compact remote-controlled vehicles are helping change the way many departments are getting their jobs done.

“As more and more departments deploy drones they continue to prove their value,” added Adams. “They provide incredible situational awareness to emergency services teams. Police officers, fire fighters, and SWAT teams across the country use drones for search and rescue, crime scene investigation, accident investigation, criminal pursuit, forest fire tracking, and damage assessment. Drones are not just toys or flying cameras.”

Students

Read more at: http://www.northwestgeorgianews.com/region/gntc-offering-drone-classes-for-law-enforcement-students/article_3081ecf2-a238-11e7-af2f-a38760b8e0a1.html

Memphis immigrant students bury ‘dreams,’ protest end of DACA

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Supporters of DACA gathered outside of the Clifford Davis Federal Building in downtown Memphis to support the continuation of DACA, which gives young immigrants work permits, allowing them to avoid deportation.
Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal