Tag Archives: forensics

Shining a light on forensics

September 18, 2017

ASU program director Kimberly Kobojek delves into the world of crime-scene analysis ahead of Tuesday event on the latest in DNA

Shows like “CSI,” “The First 48” and “Forensic Files” have captivated audiences, keying into a general fascination with murder, crime and forensics. In the world of make-believe, high-tech laboratories, fancy gadgets and instantaneous lab results solve a murder in 60 minutes (43 minutes with commercials).

But what really happens behind the scenes in a crime lab, and who are the real-world people who discover, examine and connect the clues left behind?

Kimberly Kobojek, program director of forensic science at Arizona State University’s New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the West campus, worked for 17 years as a forensic scientist for the Phoenix Police Department before joining

Read more at: https://asunow.asu.edu/20170918-discoveries-asu-forensics-biology-expert-dna

Forensics society learns real-world CSI skills from former Texas Ranger

Conifer Colorado Junior Austin Johnson holds up a freshly taken fingerprint.

By Magdalayna Drivas | Reporter

If you’ve ever wanted to collect fingerprints, analyze bloodstain patterns and solve murder mysteries alongside a former Texas Ranger, Baylor has a club for you.

The Baylor forensic society provides students education, training and hands-on experience with different scientific techniques used in forensic investigations, as well as fellowship and networking with others interested in the field.

“We have biweekly meetings and events at each meeting where we go into a certain subject within forensic science,” Austin junior and forensic society vice president Janie Contreras said. “At this week’s meeting we’ll be fingerprinting. We learn different skills related to forensic science, but we also get to do things like pre-screen a new CBS show about forensic science.”

Members of the society have the privilege of working with former Texas

Read more at: http://baylorlariat.com/2017/09/07/forensics-society-learns-real-world-csi-skills-from-former-texas-ranger/

How Forest Forensics Could Prevent the Theft of Ancient Trees

Northern California’s redwoods tower majestically above the forest floor, protected and cherished by all. All, that is, except tree poachers, who lurk in the shadows waiting to hack into some of the world’s oldest organisms and extract valuable chunks of knotted burl. Theirs is an unlikely prize: a heavy, knotted chunk of rust-red wood, nestled near the base of older trees and reminiscent of a large hornet’s nest. In the right hands, these chunks of ancient wood can prove infinitely valuable.

Burls grow like large, knotted tumors from the base and spine of a tree, but are filled with smooth flesh. That makes them perfect for use in manufacturing tables, mantels, picture frames and souvenirs like salt and pepper shakers. For poachers—often dubbed “midnight burlers”—they’re accessible and surprisingly valuable. Large slabs can fetch thousands of dollars; one furniture manufacturer estimated that a heavy stump with a burl could retail for upwards

Read more at: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/how-forest-forensics-could-prevent-the-theft-ancient-trees-180964731/

How Forest Forensics Could Prevent the Theft of Ancient Trees …

Northern California’s redwoods tower majestically above the forest floor, protected and cherished by all. All, that is, except tree poachers, who lurk in the shadows waiting to hack into some of the world’s oldest organisms and extract valuable chunks of knotted burl. Theirs is an unlikely prize: a heavy, knotted chunk of rust-red wood, nestled near the base of older trees and reminiscent of a large hornet’s nest. In the right hands, these chunks of ancient wood can prove infinitely valuable.

Burls grow like large, knotted tumors from the base and spine of a tree, but are filled with smooth flesh. That makes them perfect for use in manufacturing tables, mantels, picture frames and souvenirs like salt and pepper shakers. For poachers—often dubbed “midnight burlers”—they’re accessible and surprisingly valuable. Large slabs can fetch thousands of dollars; one furniture manufacturer estimated that a heavy stump with a burl could retail for upwards

Read more at: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/how-forest-forensics-could-prevent-the-theft-ancient-trees-180964731/

Stealing Ancient Trees is a Conservation Nightmare. Criminal Forensics Could Help

Northern California’s redwoods tower majestically above the forest floor, protected and cherished by all. All, that is, except tree poachers, who lurk in the shadows waiting to hack into some of the world’s oldest organisms and extract valuable chunks of knotted burl. Theirs is an unlikely prize: a heavy, knotted chunk of rust-red wood, nestled near the base of older trees and reminiscent of a large hornet’s nest. In the right hands, these chunks of ancient wood can prove infinitely valuable.

Burls grow like large, knotted tumors from the base and spine of a tree, but are filled with smooth flesh. That makes them perfect for use in manufacturing tables, mantels, picture frames and souvenirs like salt and pepper shakers. For poachers—often dubbed “midnight burlers”—they’re accessible and surprisingly valuable. Large slabs can fetch thousands of dollars; one furniture manufacturer estimated that a heavy stump with a burl could retail for upwards

Read more at: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/stealing-ancient-wood-crime-now-researchers-are-finally-treating-it-such-180964731/

UTM trains future forensics specialists

 

MARTIN – College students from across the country gathered in Oak Ridge this past month to spend three weeks studying forensic science from some of the top instructors in the country. The National Forensic Academy Collegiate Program is hosted by the University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation Center, and designed in part by the University of Tennessee at Martin.

“There is no other program like this in the country with the quality of instructors we bring in. This cannot be duplicated, and we are happy to share it with students from other universities,” said

Read more at: http://www.jacksonsun.com/story/news/education/2017/07/28/utm-trains-future-forensics-specialists/521155001/

How a Forensics Lab in Oregon Solves Crimes Against Animals

The United States Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory is the only lab in the world devoted entirely to investigating crimes against animals. Founded in 1988 by former crime scene investigator Ken Goddard, the lab could be mistaken for something out of a television show—except for the freezers full of animal corpses and flesh-eating beetles. Located in Ashland, Oregon, this state-of-the-art facility boasts a pathology department, an on-site forensic ornithologist and a genetics team to investigate illegal animal killings, smuggling and other crimes. With such a coveted team of experts and scientists, this unique lab is helping the entire world crack down on serious crimes against animals.

Read more at: https://www.yahoo.com/news/forensics-lab-oregon-solves-crimes-143731399.html

Forensics classes hold mock crime scene investigation

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Read more at: http://www.tulsaworld.com/communities/skiatook/schools/forensics-classes-hold-mock-crime-scene-investigation/article_f84ce9bc-2eee-5d37-8c17-bff41e0758de.html

KCKCC professors explain the forensics behind crime scene investigations

KANSAS CITY, Kan. – While investigators have located Jessica Runions’s remains, the real work is only just beginning.  

“The bones are collected and identified and labeled so that you can understand where, when, how they were found,” explained DC Broil, the director of the forensic laboratory at Kansas City, Kansas Community College. “That is recorded. And then you have to take it to the laboratory to identify if it is bone because sometimes things have been in the dirt and you don’t know for sure. It is scientifically identified. And then at that point you would identify if it’s human or non-human. At that point you would take the evidence and put it in a correct anatomical position.”

While Broil is not working on the case of the remains recently found in Cass County, she is familiar with crime scene investigations – or CSI. She currently teaches

Read more at: http://www.kshb.com/news/local-news/kckcc-professors-explain-the-forensics-behind-crime-scene-investigations