Tag Archives: forensics

Forensics class investigates mock crime scene – The Record

Yellow caution tape was strewn about a classroom at Douglas High School last Thursday for a mock crime scene investigation Kim Tretton’s forensics class was working on. The classroom was the scene of a student on student shooting due to leaked photos circulating the school.

Tretton teams up with the Douglas County Sheriff’s office Investigations Division to put on the mock crime scene every year. This year, Sgt. Ron Elges, an investigator with Douglas County was helping the students with the crime scene. He acted as the head supervisor, walking the students through the scene and giving them the basic idea of what may have happened.

“Its amazing how much they know,” Elges said. “They know the basics and how to process a scene.”

The class split up into two teams that investigated two different scenes. The students were given different roles, like photographer and

Read more at: https://www.recordcourier.com/news/local/forensics-class-investigates-mock-crime-scene/

SPECIAL REPORT: Cold cases part 5: Forensics and cold cases

*Editor’s note: The following is the final installment of a five-part series about the many unsolved, or cold, cases in the Twin Counties.

For New York State Police Senior Investigator Peter Kusminsky, a case is not closed until an arrest is made and a conviction is delivered.

Until those goals are accomplished, Kusminsky — and his fellow investigators from the state police Troop F barracks in Greene County — examines every lead, processes every piece of evidence and works with other law enforcement agencies to bring a perpetrator to justice.

“If there’s an open lead, we’ll leave the case open until we can close it,” Kusminsky said.

But in some cases, leads dry up and the trail goes cold, sometimes for weeks, months or even years. Kusminsky said a number of factors contribute to a case going cold.

“A key part of our investigation process is crime scene investigation,” Kusminsky said. “Sometimes, there may be a crime,

Read more at: https://www.hudsonvalley360.com/article/special-report-cold-cases-part-5-forensics-and-cold-cases

SPECIAL REPORT: Cold cases part 5: Forensics and cold cases …

*Editor’s note: The following is the final installment of a five-part series about the many unsolved, or cold, cases in the Twin Counties.

For New York State Police Senior Investigator Peter Kusminsky, a case is not closed until an arrest is made and a conviction is delivered.

Until those goals are accomplished, Kusminsky — and his fellow investigators from the state police Troop F barracks in Greene County — examines every lead, processes every piece of evidence and works with other law enforcement agencies to bring a perpetrator to justice.

“If there’s an open lead, we’ll leave the case open until we can close it,” Kusminsky said.

But in some cases, leads dry up and the trail goes cold, sometimes for weeks, months or even years. Kusminsky said a number of factors contribute to a case going cold.

“A key part of our investigation process is crime scene investigation,” Kusminsky said. “Sometimes, there may be a crime,

Read more at: https://www.hudsonvalley360.com/article/special-report-cold-cases-part-5-forensics-and-cold-cases

WVU Tech to host forensics workshop Nov. 4 – Beckley Register

The WVU Tech Forensic Investigation program will host a Crime Scene Investigation Community Workshop from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Nov. 4 on the WVU Tech campus in Beckley.

The casual workshop is purpose-built for fans of popular crime scene investigation shows or people who have an interest in forensic investigation. The program will cover crime scene processing, including note-taking, photography, sketching, measuring, searching and evidence collection and packaging.

Attendees will put what they learn to the test as they examine a mock crime scene during the workshop.

“This is the perfect chance for people to get a better understanding of what it takes to process a crime scene and the steps that it actually involves,” said Roger Jefferys, a forensic investigation professor at WVU Tech.

“It’s a community thing. It’s not a training course. This is for those who have a general interest and want to learn more about the field, and the focus

Read more at: http://www.register-herald.com/news/wvu-tech-to-host-forensics-workshop-nov/article_2282595f-230e-556c-bcf2-56da61d68791.html

The Grim Crime-Scene Dollhouses Made by the ‘Mother of Forensics’

The kitchen is well equipped and stocked. There’s a stove, a refrigerator full of food, a table with a rolling pin and a bowl, and a sink with Ivory soap. The wall calendar, featuring with a sailing ship, says it’s April 1944. But there’s something else: Every item is miniature, hand-crafted, and a doll lies on the floor, apparently dead, cause unknown.

This is one of Frances Glessner Lee’s Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death, a series of 1/12-scale dioramas based on real-life criminal investigation cases. They were used—and continue to be studied even today—to train investigators in the art of evidence gathering, meticulous documentation, and keen observation. And they were created by one of the most unlikely and influential figures in crime scene forensics.

Glessner Lee’s early life followed a trajectory unsurprising for a girl from a wealthy family in late-19th-century America. She was

Read more at: http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/frances-glessner-lee-crime-scence-forensics-investigation-dioramas

GPD highlights role of proper CSI during National Forensics Science Week

GREENSBORO — During National Forensics Science Week, the Greensboro
Police Department is highlighting the important role of proper crime
scene investigation.

On Tuesday and Thursday the department is helping out parents by
fingerprinting their children so they can keep a child ID kit. And on
Saturday, you can take part in “A Day in the Life: CSI” to
get a behind the scenes look at what investigators do daily.

One forensic specialist says the goal is to debunk myths people see
on TV shows like “Law and Order.”

“Fingerprints aren’t on certain surfaces. It depends on how the
person handled the item; did they smear it? Did they put their hand on
the item easily? These are the items we want to explain because people
have an idea that when we show up we are

Read more at: http://www.twcnews.com/nc/triad/news/2017/09/19/gpd-highlights-role-of-proper-csi-during-national-forensics-science-week.html

How Can Data Forensics Help The Fight Against Malware?

According to Gartner, enterprises spend just over $10 billion on prevention and detection methods such as anti-virus software, firewalls and detection intrusion systems. Yet, enterprises are fighting a losing battle. IT teams need enhanced weapons, in the form of better intelligence, for the battle ahead. That insight can come from remediation in the form of network forensics.

Similar to a crime scene investigation, forensics provides network security teams with the “DNA” clues of an attack. Network forensics is about inspecting the malware and understanding how it works, its key characteristics, exploits, and attack vectors. Forensics and remediation provide the intelligence to prevent new attacks.

Malware exhibits particular patterns of application behaviour and network forensics that would have spotted SMB traffic on the network and the version being used – for example, WannaCry exploited SMB v1

Capturing the right data
Forensics allow enterprise security teams to observe evasive adversaries by

Read more at: https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/opinions/data-forensics-help-fight-against/

Shining a light on forensics

September 18, 2017

ASU program director Kimberly Kobojek delves into the world of crime-scene analysis ahead of Tuesday event on the latest in DNA

Shows like “CSI,” “The First 48” and “Forensic Files” have captivated audiences, keying into a general fascination with murder, crime and forensics. In the world of make-believe, high-tech laboratories, fancy gadgets and instantaneous lab results solve a murder in 60 minutes (43 minutes with commercials).

But what really happens behind the scenes in a crime lab, and who are the real-world people who discover, examine and connect the clues left behind?

Kimberly Kobojek, program director of forensic science at Arizona State University’s New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the West campus, worked for 17 years as a forensic scientist for the Phoenix Police Department before joining

Read more at: https://asunow.asu.edu/20170918-discoveries-asu-forensics-biology-expert-dna

Forensics society learns real-world CSI skills from former Texas Ranger

Conifer Colorado Junior Austin Johnson holds up a freshly taken fingerprint.

By Magdalayna Drivas | Reporter

If you’ve ever wanted to collect fingerprints, analyze bloodstain patterns and solve murder mysteries alongside a former Texas Ranger, Baylor has a club for you.

The Baylor forensic society provides students education, training and hands-on experience with different scientific techniques used in forensic investigations, as well as fellowship and networking with others interested in the field.

“We have biweekly meetings and events at each meeting where we go into a certain subject within forensic science,” Austin junior and forensic society vice president Janie Contreras said. “At this week’s meeting we’ll be fingerprinting. We learn different skills related to forensic science, but we also get to do things like pre-screen a new CBS show about forensic science.”

Members of the society have the privilege of working with former Texas

Read more at: http://baylorlariat.com/2017/09/07/forensics-society-learns-real-world-csi-skills-from-former-texas-ranger/