Tag Archives: detective

Widow of former Albany detective plans to file lawsuit

After losing her husband in the line of duty, the widow of a former Albany detective is speaking out. Linda Mayville claims the city isn’t providing her with the benefits she’s entitled to following her husband’s death nearly four years ago.

Mayville is seeking legal counsel and plans to file a lawsuit against the city of Albany if Mayor Kathy Sheehan doesn’t respond by Friday.

In 2008, Linda’s husband, Douglas Mayville, was diagnosed with Wegener’s granulomatosis, and what followed was a lengthy and gruesome medical battle, which has turned into a legal dispute. Mayville served the city as a police officer and later as a crime scene investigator from 1982 to 1997. During those 16 years, the nature of his work led to an exposure of toxic chemicals which would ultimately lead to a painful autoimmune disease known as Wegener’s disease.

According to the State of New York Workers’ Compensation Board, Mayville died

Read more at: http://spectrumlocalnews.com/nys/capital-region/news/2018/02/13/widow-of-former-albany-detective-planning-to-file-lawsuit

CSI effect is a myth: forensic detective series do not make criminals …

Since Sir Arthur Conan Doyle first penned the exploits of Sherlock Holmes in 1887, the justice profession has despaired that revealing the art of the detective could only help criminals evade capture.

Similarly, when CSI: Crime Scene Investigation launched in 2000, detailing the forensic techniques of the Las Vegas Police Department, social commentators warned it gave miscreants the means of, literally, getting away with murder.

Even Lord Leveson warned of the ‘CSI Effect’ claiming it created unrealistic expectations of forensic services which helped criminals escape a guilty verdict if crime scene evidence was inconclusive.

But now a research project has proved that the phenomenon does not exist.

A team of psychologists at Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, trawled police databases, interviewed criminals and carried out crime-scene experiments and concluded the ‘CSI Effect’ is simply a myth.

“We can now dispel certain of the myths that have been coursing through the

Read more at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/01/05/csi-effect-myth-forensic-detective-series-do-not-make-criminals/

CSI effect is a myth: forensic detective series do not make criminals better at crime

Since Sir Arthur Conan Doyle first penned the exploits of Sherlock Holmes in 1887, the justice profession has despaired that revealing the art of the detective could only help criminals evade capture.

Similarly, when CSI: Crime Scene Investigation launched in 2000, detailing the forensic techniques of the Las Vegas Police Department, social commentators warned it gave miscreants the means of, literally, getting away with murder.

Even Lord Leveson warned of the ‘CSI Effect’ claiming it created unrealistic expectations of forensic services which helped criminals escape a guilty verdict if crime scene evidence was inconclusive.

But now a research project has proved that the phenomenon does not exist.

A team of psychologists at Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, trawled police databases, interviewed criminals and carried out crime-scene experiments and concluded the ‘CSI Effect’ is simply a myth.

“We can now dispel certain of the myths that have been coursing through the

Read more at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/01/05/csi-effect-myth-forensic-detective-series-do-not-make-criminals/

Did TV cameras affect a detective’s crime scene investigation …

November 10, 2017, 8:13 AM|
When an Atlanta Police detective responds to a 911 call reporting a rape and a shooting death, she’s trailed by camera crews working from a reality show. Did the TV spotlight cause a rush to judgment? Erin Moriarty joins “CBS This Morning” to preview “Reality Kills,” an all-new “48 Hours” airing Saturday at 10/9c on CBS.

Read more at: https://www.cbsnews.com/videos/did-tv-cameras-affect-a-detectives-crime-scene-investigation/

Did TV cameras affect a detective’s crime scene investigation?

November 10, 2017, 8:13 AM|
When an Atlanta Police detective responds to a 911 call reporting a rape and a shooting death, she’s trailed by camera crews working from a reality show. Did the TV spotlight cause a rush to judgment? Erin Moriarty joins “CBS This Morning” to preview “Reality Kills,” an all-new “48 Hours” airing Saturday at 10/9c on CBS.

Read more at: https://www.cbsnews.com/videos/did-tv-cameras-affect-a-detectives-crime-scene-investigation/

HAMAD TRIAL | Jurors will hear from lead detective on Thursday

4:40 p.m.

WARREN

The Nasser Hamad aggravated murder trial has adjourned for the day after jurors watched a videotaped interview in which Hamad told two detectives at the Howland Police Department what happened the day of the shootings.

After playing the video, attorneys in the case continued to question Capt. Tony Villanueva of the Trumbull County Sheriff’s Office, who was a Howland detective at the time of the killings at Hamad’s house on state Route 46 that caused him to be charged.

Defense attorney Robert Dixon asked Villaneuva several questions about whether Villanueva had followed up on some of the issues Hamad raised in the interview about criminal offenses having been committed against him. Hamad talked about numerous incidents of harassment he said his girlfriend’s family had done to him over the last six months.

Villanueva said he left the Howland Police Department in May and was no longer involved in the investigation.

The

Read more at: http://www.vindy.com/news/2017/oct/25/hamad-trial-mother-detective-and-more-testify-toda/?mobile

Crime scene investigation: the Glasgow detective who became a legend in the 1960s

Tom Goodall made his name during the Peter Manuel enquiry in 1958. He became famous for being ‘the man who was always there’, insisting on being called out at any hour of the day or night when a major crime occurred. Such dedication took a heavy toll on his health and he died suddenly at the age of 58.

The image of Tom Goodall portrayed in the press and confirmed by those who worked with him was of a quiet man who sat smoking his pipe, deep in thought as he wrestled with the complex strands of an enquiry. “I’ve seen him… pipe-smoking his way through murder investigations with the skill and wisdom of a man dedicated to his job 48 hours of the day,” was how one commentator put it. Yet some of his most dramatic cases showed that he could also assume the role of a

Read more at: http://www.scotsman.com/news/crime-scene-investigation-the-glasgow-detective-who-became-a-legend-in-the-1960s-1-4588554

Retiring Treasure Island detective leaves decades-long legacy of personal service to community

TREASURE ISLAND — For more than 30 years, Kathi Lovelace patrolled the city’s streets, investigated its crimes and found lost dogs, cats, snakes, birds and wedding rings.

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Last week, hundreds of residents, friends, family and officials gathered at the Community Center to say an enthusiastic “thank you” as she retired from her official law enforcement duties.

“It has been a privilege and an honor to work with you. … I am a better officer and police chief because of you,” police Chief Armand Boudreau told Lovelace.

He then presented her with a plaque, a memento-filled shadow box and an album filled with photos from her career on the city’s police force.

Boudreau

Read more at: http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/retiring-treasure-island-detective-leaves-decades-long-legacy-of-personal/2335574

Retiring Treasure Island detective leaves decades-long legacy of personal service to community

TREASURE ISLAND — For more than 30 years, Kathi Lovelace patrolled the city’s streets, investigated its crimes and found lost dogs, cats, snakes, birds and wedding rings.

Last week, hundreds of residents, friends, family and officials gathered at the Community Center to say an enthusiastic “thank you” as she retired from her official law enforcement duties.

“It has been a privilege and an honor to work with you. … I am a better officer and police chief because of you,” police Chief Armand Boudreau told Lovelace.

He then presented her with a plaque, a memento-filled shadow box and an album filled with photos from her career on the city’s police force.

Boudreau recounted how Lovelace interviewed Citrus County residents during the 2005 investigation into the Jessica Luns­ford abduction and murder as part of the state’s Child Abduction Response

Read more at: http://www.tbo.com/news/publicsafety/retiring-treasure-island-detective-leaves-decades-long-legacy-of-personal/2335574