Monthly Archives: August 2017

Boston Contest: Win Tickets to See Singer Jana Kramer at The Wilbur!

Jana Kramer is an award-winning country artist. Her platinum debut single, “Why Ya Wanna,” soared to No. 3 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart in 2012 making her the most played new artist of that year and her self-titled debut album hit No. 5. In 2013, the Academy of Country Music honored her with its Top New Female Artist Award and Blake Shelton picked her to open on his “Ten Times Crazier” tour.

In 2015, Jana released her highly anticipated sophomore album “thirty one” in which she co-wrote over half of the tracks. In 2016, Jana received nominations for Female Vocalist of the Year from the Academy of Country Music Awards, Breakthrough Female of the Year and Female Vocalist of the Year from the American Country Countdown Awards and Female Video of the Year from the CMT Music Awards for “I Got the Boy.” She was a finalist on Season

Read more at: http://www.metro.us/games/sweepstakes/boston-contest-win-tickets-to-see-singer-jana-kramer-the-wilbur

Snoqualmie Police Explorers take top spots at challenge camp

Members of the Snoqualmie Police Explorers, a youth program for kids ages 14 to 21, attended the Oregon Law Enforcement Challenge at Camp Rilea in Warrenton Aug. 3 to 6, obtaining recognition in several events along with experience preparing for law enforcement careers.

Approximately 183 explorers from 27 posts statewide participated in scenarios that included active shooter, building search, courtroom testimony, crime in progress, crime scene investigation, domestic disturbance, high-risk traffic stop, impaired driving investigation, girls’ one-mile run, and a mystery event.

The Snoqualmie Explorers placed first in marksman shooting and first in the female one-mile run, along with earning second place in traffic stops.

“We are very proud of our Explorers and want to congratulate them on their hard work and assistance to our department and our community,” said Police Chief Perry Phipps.

Snoqualmie Explorers attending the event included Taylor Dahl, Emma Fourge, Mikayla Garay, Elizabeth Johanson (Post Sergeant), Michael Keller (Post Captain),

Read more at: http://www.valleyrecord.com/life/snoqualmie-police-explorers-take-top-spots-at-challenge-camp/

The Link Between Animal Abuse and Murder

Thompson points to the case of Alexander Hernandez, who was arrested in California in 2014 for shooting a dog—a crime that might in some states pass as a misdemeanor or criminal damage and not become grounds for further investigation. But when the police ran ballistics on Hernandez’s gun, they identified him as the man behind a series of murders.

“Eighty percent of law enforcement still doesn’t know about that link, but once you show them, they get it right away,” Thompson says. “It’s huge. The more people know about it, the more crimes we’re going to solve.”

* * *

Merck hasn’t won everyone over, however. Her approach can be controversial, especially among more traditionally minded vets and judges and juries who aren’t as willing as she or Thompson are to make “the link.”

A danger of veterinary forensics, as critics see it, is wrongful conviction—the possibility that too much is

Read more at: https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/08/melinda-merck-veterinary-forensics/538575/

Cold case trial continues in Chelan County Superior Court

trial
Left: Bernard Swaim, Right: Stephen E. Smith
(Photos courtesy of the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office)

WENATCHEE- Opening arguments were presented yesterday in the murder trial of Bernard Swaim, the Sultan man accused in the cold-case murder of Stephen Smith.

Swaim and his former wife Dawn Soles are charged with first degree murder in the death of Stephen Smith in 1982.

Chelan County Prosecutor, Doug Shae told the jury in his opening statement, “This is an old case, a cold case, with a burning secret — Mr. Swaim’s secret,” Shae called to the stand witnesses, such as Smith’s former dentist who testified that he recognized a broken tooth found at Smith’s Cashmere home as the same tooth he had previously treated.

Swaim’s attorney Nick Yedinak argued that his client should be acquitted based upon missing items from the crime scene,investigation missteps and questionable

Read more at: http://www.ncwlife.com/cold-case-trial-continues-chelan-county-superior-court/

Man Pleads Guilty To 1993 Killing After New Evidence Re-Opens Cold Case

A Florida man has pleaded guilty on Tuesday for a 1993 murder, and police are crediting the Oxygen show “Cold Justice” for the closure on the cold case.

Angelo E. Ruth, 61, was sentenced to 11 years in prison for the death of Mattie Henry, 40, according to WINK News. Henry’s half-naked body was found in September 1993 near a recreational center. She suffered a gunshot wound to her head.

Fort Myers police said “Cold Justice” helped renew leads in the case. The forensic evidence and witness statements that the show brought out led to Ruth’s arrest in 2016.

Two years before Henry’s murder, Ruth took out a fraudulent life insurance policy on her, according to an ABC affiliate. Investigators with the show helped police confirm that Ruth forged Henry’s signature on the $100,000 life insurance policy, according to the Root. Then, publicity from the show allowed key witnesses to come forward, and

Read more at: http://www.oxygen.com/blogs/man-pleads-guilty-to-1993-killing-after-new-evidence-reopens-cold-case

Realistic south Cumbria crime scene exercise in running for national recognition

SCOURING for evidence, analysing forensics and responding to emergency situations, students at the University of Cumbria are given a truly authentic experience when it comes to crime scene investigation training.

Now, that experience has seen the institution’s Major Incident team shortlisted for a prestigious Collaborative Award for Teaching Excellence (CATE). The accolade recognises outstanding contributions to teaching by teams from higher education providers.

The team reached the finals for the award with its annual mock crime scene investigation scenario, staged at the university’s Ambleside campus in real time over three days. Uniting members of the university’s Forensic Science, Policing and Paramedic Practice departments, it delivers a highly realistic scenario unique to the university which helps students develop the skills required to work in their prospective professions.

Students play their respective roles in a major incident – from crime scene investigators to forensic scientists, paramedics and police officers alongside serving professionals and trained

Read more at: http://www.nwemail.co.uk/news/lakes/Realistic-south-Cumbria-crime-scene-exercise-in-running-for-national-recognition-da21c02d-c0f4-473b-a3a9-0fbe46cc5c41-ds

Retiring Treasure Island detective leaves decades-long legacy of personal service to community

TREASURE ISLAND — For more than 30 years, Kathi Lovelace patrolled the city’s streets, investigated its crimes and found lost dogs, cats, snakes, birds and wedding rings.

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Last week, hundreds of residents, friends, family and officials gathered at the Community Center to say an enthusiastic “thank you” as she retired from her official law enforcement duties.

“It has been a privilege and an honor to work with you. … I am a better officer and police chief because of you,” police Chief Armand Boudreau told Lovelace.

He then presented her with a plaque, a memento-filled shadow box and an album filled with photos from her career on the city’s police force.

Boudreau

Read more at: http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/retiring-treasure-island-detective-leaves-decades-long-legacy-of-personal/2335574

Retiring Treasure Island detective leaves decades-long legacy of personal service to community

TREASURE ISLAND — For more than 30 years, Kathi Lovelace patrolled the city’s streets, investigated its crimes and found lost dogs, cats, snakes, birds and wedding rings.

Last week, hundreds of residents, friends, family and officials gathered at the Community Center to say an enthusiastic “thank you” as she retired from her official law enforcement duties.

“It has been a privilege and an honor to work with you. … I am a better officer and police chief because of you,” police Chief Armand Boudreau told Lovelace.

He then presented her with a plaque, a memento-filled shadow box and an album filled with photos from her career on the city’s police force.

Boudreau recounted how Lovelace interviewed Citrus County residents during the 2005 investigation into the Jessica Luns­ford abduction and murder as part of the state’s Child Abduction Response

Read more at: http://www.tbo.com/news/publicsafety/retiring-treasure-island-detective-leaves-decades-long-legacy-of-personal/2335574

In 2004 Cold Case, A Big Break Emerges – WGRZ

NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. – For more than a decade, the family and friends of Theresa Insana have suffered through a terrible ordeal, filled with uncertainty, puzzlement and an endless stream of unanswered questions.

Insana, a promising 26-year-old sales manager from Niagara Falls, was found dead in Nov. 2004 in the Las Vegas area, where she’d moved to pursue her career. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department quickly launched a homicide investigation, but the case lingered under multiple detective teams before finally landing in the hands of the latest Cold Case investigators.

The case has received a great deal of publicity — including a featured segment on Dateline NBC in 2011 — but police have never been able to make an arrest.

Read more at: http://www.wgrz.com/news/local/in-2004-cold-case-a-big-break-emerges/469442376

East Chicago police officer sentenced to 3 months in prison for failing to file tax returns


Lauren covers breaking news, crime and courts for The Times. She previously worked at The Herald-News in Joliet covering government, public policy, and the region’s heroin epidemic. She holds a master’s degree in Public Affairs Reporting.