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Inside the World of Crime Scene Investigation

Forensics For Dummies takes you inside the world of crime scene investigation to give you the low down on this exciting field. Written by a doctor and former Law & Order consultant, this guide will have you solving crimes along with your favorite TV shows in no time. From fingerprints and fibers to blood and ballistics, you’ll walk through the processes that yield significant information from the smallest clues. You’ll learn how Hollywood gets it wrong, and how real-world forensics experts work every day in fields as diverse as biology, psychology, anthropology, medicine, information technology, and more. If you’re interested in a forensics career, you’ll find out how to break in—and the education you’ll need to do the type of forensics work that interests you the most. Written for the true forensics fan, this book doesn’t shy away from the details; you’ll learn what goes on at the morgue as you determine cause of death, and you’ll climb into the mind of a killer as you learn how forensic psychologists narrow down the suspect list.

Crime shows are entertaining, but the reality is that most forensics cases aren’t wrapped up in an hour. This book shows you how it’s really done, and the amazing technology and brilliant people that do it every day.

  • Learn who does what, when they do it, and how it’s done
  • Discover the many fields involved in crime scene investigation
  • Understand what really happens inside a forensics lab
  • Examine famous forensics cases more intriguing than any TV show

Forensic scientists work in a variety of environments and in many different capacities. If you think television makes it look interesting, just wait until you learn what it’s really like! Forensics For Dummiestakes you on a tour of the real-world science behind solving the case.

Passer-By Singlehandedly Catches Armed Robber on Street with Tragic History

On Friday evening, an armed robber tried to rob a branch office of the Croatian Post at Dragutin Golik Street in the Voltino neighbourhood in Zagreb. He threatened two female employees, aged 40 and 46, with a gun and demanded money. Fearing for their lives, they gave him several tens of thousands of kunas, reports 24sata.hr on December 17, 2017.

The robber tried to flee with the money but was pursued by a 23-year-old man who happened to be in the vicinity of the post office at the time of the robbery. Without thinking much about the danger, he managed to catch with the thief, overpowered him and kept him under his control until the police arrived at the scene.

The police later confirmed that the post office was robbed by a 30-year-old man, who was taken into custody.

The brave citizen suffered minor injuries while wrestling with the

Read more at: https://www.total-croatia-news.com/lifestyle/23983-passer-by-singlehandedly-catches-armed-robber-on-street-with-tragic-history

Meet the researchers who used TV episodes of CSI to train artificial intelligence

Federal lawmakers want to have a say in defining artificial intelligence. Researchers are now using TV shows to feed the predictive capability of an AI system. Google said in recent days it’s opening an AI-focused research facility in China. And on and on the headlines keep coming, all of which is to say that interest in AI remains acute — and its presence pervasive — as 2017 draws to a close.

And, based on a few recent developments, 2018 should be another big year of AI-related leaps forward as machines expand their influence over the minutiae of our lives.

Dr. Lea Frermann certainly thinks that’s the case. She’s a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Edinburgh who was part of a team that used episodes from the popular TV crime series CSI — specifically, the video, audio and text related to those episodes — to train an AI system to learn how

Read more at: http://bgr.com/2017/12/16/meet-the-researchers-who-used-tv-episodes-of-csi-to-train-artificial-intelligence/

Suspect in triple murder at Belleville salon says prosecutors ‘have no evidence’ – Belleville News

The man accused of a triple murder in a Belleville hair salon in 2005 said in a jailhouse interview last week that he’s innocent, and that the prosecution knows it because they already charged someone else who was acquitted.

Samuel L. Johnson, 52, was charged last year with the murders of hairstylist Michael Cooney and two of Cooney’s clients, 79-year-old Doris Fischer and 82-year-old Dorothy Bone. The three were found stabbed to death on March 2, 2005 in Cooney’s home-based salon at 7813 W. Main St. in Belleville. Fischer and Bone were sisters.

“I am innocent,” Johnson said. “If you get a conviction, you will be convicting an innocent man.”

St. Clair County State’s Attorney Brendan Kelly charged Johnson last year. Johnson had been scheduled to go to trial last week, but the trial was continued at the request of the defense.

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Read more at: http://www.bnd.com/news/local/article190144524.html

A 37-year-old mystery solved: Reopening case led to confession in … – Journal Gazette and Times

In Coles County, it’s always been called the Airtight Bridge murder because of the bridge where, on Oct. 19, 1980, the body of a nude woman with her head, hands and feet missing was found in the Embarras River.

Read more at: http://jg-tc.com/news/local/a--year-old-mystery-solved-reopening-case-led-to/article_478acc8a-9b15-51da-b805-6068d3b399e3.html

A 37-year-old mystery solved: Reopening case led to confession in Airtight Bridge murder – Journal Gazette and Times

In Coles County, it’s always been called the Airtight Bridge murder because of the bridge where, on Oct. 19, 1980, the body of a nude woman with her head, hands and feet missing was found in the Embarras River.

Read more at: http://jg-tc.com/news/local/a--year-old-mystery-solved-reopening-case-led-to/article_478acc8a-9b15-51da-b805-6068d3b399e3.html

Seaside Heights man killed by van in Toms River

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TOMS RIVER – A 62-year-old pedestrian was killed by a van on Friday, just before sunrise, Toms River police said. 

Police responded to Route 37, near Peter Avenue, to find Bruce Nussenbaum, of Seaside Heights, deceased, said Ralph Stocco, a spokesman for the Toms River police. Nussenbaum died as a result of colliding with a 2006 GMC van driven by Richard Roshop, 47, of Toms River, Stocco said. 

Nussenbaum was in the road and not at a crosswalk when he was struck by the van, Stocco said. 

At the time of the crash, Roshop was driving the van east on Route 37 in the right

Read more at: http://www.app.com/story/news/crime/jersey-mayhem/2017/12/15/seaside-heights-pedestrian-62-dies-van-crash/957298001/

New investigation into murder case reopens family wounds

FOREVER MISSED Above, Rhonda Wicht and her son, Donnie, smile big for the camera in 1975. Below, an undated photo of Wicht. The mother and child were killed in 1978 and police are seeking their murderer. Photos courtesy of Shelley Hamilton

FOREVER MISSED— Above, Rhonda Wicht and her son, Donnie, smile big for the camera in 1975. Below, an undated photo of Wicht. The mother and child were killed in 1978 and police are seeking their murderer. Photos courtesy of Shelley Hamilton



The vision of the lifeless bodies of Rhonda Hamilton Wicht and her 4-year-old son, Donnie, lying in their bedrooms in a Simi Valley apartment are still burned in Rick Hamilton’s mind.

It was the morning of Nov. 11, 1978,

Read more at: https://www.mpacorn.com/articles/new-investigation-into-murder-case-reopens-family-wounds/

Forget Face ID: Scientists Fight Cybercrime With Photos – Geek.com

I’ve watched enough CSI: Crime Scene Investigation to know that forensic scientists can trace a single bullet directly to the gun that shot it.

Apparently, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York are fans of Gil Grissom, too, because they developed similar technology for tracking photos to phones.

The technique, to be presented at a conference in February, could lead to new ways of fighting cybercrime.

“Like snowflakes, no two smartphones are the same,” lead study author Kui Ren said in a statement. “Each device, regardless of the manufacturer or make, can be identified through a pattern of microscopic imaging flaws that are present in every picture they take.”

Mind. Blown.

“It’s kind of like matching bullets to a gun,” he added, “only we’re matching photos to a smartphone camera.”

Not yet ready for prime time, this technology is poised to become part of the authentication process, like a PIN or password.

Centered

Read more at: https://www.geek.com/tech/forget-face-id-scientists-fight-cybercrime-with-photos-1725963/

Forget Face ID: Scientists Fight Cybercrime With Photos

I’ve watched enough CSI: Crime Scene Investigation to know that forensic scientists can trace a single bullet directly to the gun that shot it.

Apparently, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York are fans of Gil Grissom, too, because they developed similar technology for tracking photos to phones.

The technique, to be presented at a conference in February, could lead to new ways of fighting cybercrime.

“Like snowflakes, no two smartphones are the same,” lead study author Kui Ren said in a statement. “Each device, regardless of the manufacturer or make, can be identified through a pattern of microscopic imaging flaws that are present in every picture they take.”

Mind. Blown.

“It’s kind of like matching bullets to a gun,” he added, “only we’re matching photos to a smartphone camera.”

Not yet ready for prime time, this technology is poised to become part of the authentication process, like a PIN or password.

Centered

Read more at: https://www.geek.com/tech/forget-face-id-scientists-fight-cybercrime-with-photos-1725963/